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#Assessment of #risk associated with #influenza A(#H5N8) virus, 17 November 2016 (@WHO)

  Title : #Assessment of #risk associated with #influenza A(#H5N8) virus, 17 November 2016. Subject : Avian Influenza, H5N8 subtype, multi...

3 Dec 2016

#MERS-CoV, #Saudi Arabia: Two New Cases reported in the last 24 hours (@SaudiMOH, Dec. 3 ‘16)

 

Title: MERS-CoV, Saudi Arabia: Two New Cases reported in the last 24 hours.

Subject: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Epidemic in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, daily update.

Source: Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health, full page: (LINK).

Code: [     ]

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MOH: '2 New Confirmed Coronavirus Cases Recorded' Today

12/3/2016

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New Cases: [Sex, Age, Citizenship, Resident in, Health Status, Note]

  1. M, 62, Saudi, Saqaqah, stable; *
  2. M, 73, Saudi, Medina, stable; *

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{*} Primary cases (contact with unspecified animal).

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New Recoveries:

  • No reports

New Deaths:

  • No reports

Cumulative number of confirmed cases and deaths since June 2012:

[Total No. of Cases – Total No. of Deaths – Patients under treatment]

  • 1496At least 618 - 15

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Keywords: MERS-CoV; Updates; Saudi Arabia.

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Today is the International #Day of #Persons with #Disabilities (@WHO)

 

Title: Today is the International #Day of #Persons with #Disabilities.

Subject: Physical and mental disabilities, world day.

Source: World Health Organization (WHO), full page: (LINK). via Instagram.

Code: [ SOC ]

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Keywords: WHO; Worldwide; Society.

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#Germany, #Avian #Influenza #H5N8–#Situation #Update–New #Epizootics reported on December 1-2 2016 (FLI, edited)

 

Title: #Germany, #Avian #Influenza #H5N8–#Situation #Update–New #Epizootics reported on December 1-2 2016.

Subject: Avian Influenza, H5N8 subtype, poultry and wild birds epizootics in Germany.

Source: Friedrich-Loeffler Institut, Germany, full page: (LINK). Edited.

Code: [     ][     ]

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Friedrich-Loeffler Institut – Germany

Avian Influenza H5N8 - Situation Update - New Epizootics reported on December 1-2 2016

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[Species - Federal State - District - Reporting Date]

  1. Seagulls - Schleswig-Holstein - Lubeck, City – Dec. 2
  2. Hens - Schleswig-Holstein – Dithmarschen – Dec. 2
  3. Hens - Brandenburg – Oberhavel – Dec. 2
  4. Seagulls - Brandenburg - Potsdam-Mittelmark – Dec. 2
  5. Swans - Berlin - Berlin, city – Dec. 1
  6. Swans - Berlin - Berlin, city – Dec. 1
  7. Wild (unspecified) - Berlin - Berlin, city – Dec. 1
  8. Buzzard - Mecklenburg-Vorpommen – Nordwestmecklenburg – Dec. 1

(...)

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[Epizootic Location Map]

epideutz212

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{Stadte} = Towns;

{Bundeslander} = State Borders.

{Regierungsbezirke} = Regional Borders.

{Kreise} = Districts.

{     } = 1-3 Outbreaks;

{     } = 4-8 Outbreaks;

{     } = 9-50 Outbreaks.

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Keywords: Germany; Updates; Avian Influenza; H5N8; Poultry; Wild Birds.

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#USA, #Florida: Department of Health Daily #Zika #Update (December 2 2016)

 

Title: #USA, #Florida: Department of Health Daily #Zika #Update.

Subject: Zika Virus, current epidemiological situation in Florida.

Source: US State of Florida Department of Health, full page: (LINK).

Code: [     ]

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Department of Health Daily Zika Update

By Florida Department of Health, Office of Communications / December 02, 2016 / Press Release / Contact: Communications Office, NewsMedia@flhealth.gov - (850) 245-4111

Tallahassee, Fla.

In an effort to keep Florida residents and visitors safe and aware about the status of the Zika virus, the department will issue a Zika virus update each week day. Updates will include a Zika case count by county and information to keep Floridians informed and prepared.

In order to keep the public informed, the department has posted our investigation process here.

There are two new travel-related cases today with one in Collier and one in Hillsborough.

There no new locally acquired cases today.

The total number of Zika cases reported in Florida as of today is 1,222.

 

[Infection Type - Infection Count]

  • Travel-Related Infections of Zika – 963
  • Locally Acquired Infections of Zika – 244
  • Undetermined – 15
  • Pregnant Women with Lab-Evidence of Zika – 174
    • Note: these categories are not mutually exclusive and cannot be added together.

Please visit our website to see the full list of travel-related cases by county.

Today, Governor Rick Scott announced that the department has cleared the Little River area of local Zika transmission.

The department has not detected any cases of local transmission of the Zika virus in 45 days in this area. The newly cleared area, which is about one square mile, is located NW 79th St. to the North, NW 63rd St. to the South, NW 10th Ave. to the West and N. Miami Ave. to the East.

(…)

The department is currently conducting 13 active investigations. The department has closed 39 investigations. Information regarding the investigations can be found here. If investigations reveal additional areas of active transmission, the department will announce a defined area of concern.

The department has conducted Zika virus testing for more than 10,712 people statewide. Florida currently has the capacity to test 5,652 people for active Zika virus and 4,929 for Zika antibodies. At Governor Scott’s direction, all county health departments now offer free Zika risk assessment and testing to pregnant women.

(…)

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Keywords: USA; Updates; Zika Virus; Florida.

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2 Dec 2016

Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N6, S. #Korea [six #poultry #outbreaks] (#OIE, Dec. 2 ‘16)

 

Title: Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N6, S. #Korea [six #poultry #outbreaks].

Subject: Avian Influenza, H5N6 subtype, poultry epizootics in South Korea.

Source: OIE, full page: (LINK).

Code: [     ]

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Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N6, Korea (Rep. of)

Information received on 02/12/2016 from Dr Oh Soon-Min, Director - Chief Veterinary Officer, General Animal Health Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (MAFRA), SEJONG-SI, Korea (Rep. of)

  • Summary
    • Report type Follow-up report No. 2
    • Date of start of the event 16/11/2016
    • Date of confirmation of the event 17/11/2016
    • Report date 02/12/2016
    • Date submitted to OIE 02/12/2016
    • Reason for notification New strain of a listed disease
    • Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
    • Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
    • Serotype H5N6
    • Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
    • This event pertains to the whole country
    • Related reports
      • Immediate notification (23/11/2016) / Follow-up report No. 1 (24/11/2016) / Follow-up report No. 2 (02/12/2016)
  • New outbreaks (6)
    • Outbreak 1 - Gimje-si, Yongji-li, Geumgu-myeon , JEOLLABUK-DO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 21/11/2016
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds – 16700 – … - 0 – 16700 – 0
          • Affected population Duck
    • Outbreak 2 - Eumseong-gum, Bonghyun-li, Maengdong-myeon, CHUNGCHEONGBUK-DO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 21/11/2016
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds – 7122 – … – 0 – 7122 – 0
    • Outbreak 3 - Eumseong-gun, Sindon-li, Maengdong-myeon, CHUNGCHEONGBUK-DO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 22/11/2016
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds – 8048 – … – 0 – 8048 – 0
    • Outbreak 4 - Eumseong-gun, Bonghyun-li, Maengdong-myeon, CHUNGCHEONGBUK-DO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 22/11/2016
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds – 9925 – … – 0 – 9925 – 0
    • Outbreak 5 - Eumseong-gun, Bonghyun-li, Maengdong-myeon, CHUNGCHEONGBUK-DO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 22/11/2016
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds – 4431 – … – 0 – 4431 – 0
    • Outbreak 6 - Eumseong-gun, Masan-li, Maengdong-myeon, CHUNGCHEONGBUK-DO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 22/11/2016
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds – 6798 – … – 0 – 6798 – 0
    • Summary of outbreaks
      • Total outbreaks: 6
        • Total animals affected: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
          • Birds – 53024 – ** – 0 – 53024 – 0
        • Outbreak statistics: Species - Apparent morbidity rate - Apparent mortality rate - Apparent case fatality rate - Proportion susceptible animals lost*
          • Birds – ** - 0.00% – ** - 100.00%
            • *Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
            • **Not calculated because of missing information
  • Epidemiology
    • Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
      • Unknown or inconclusive
      • Contact with wild species
  • Control measures
    • Measures applied
      • Movement control inside the country
      • Screening
      • Disinfection / Disinfestation
      • Traceability
      • Dipping / Spraying
      • Quarantine
      • Surveillance outside containment and/or protection zone
      • Stamping out
      • Official destruction of animal products
      • Official disposal of carcasses, by-products and waste
      • Surveillance within containment and/or protection zone
      • Control of wildlife reservoirs
      • Zoning
      • Vaccination prohibited
      • No treatment of affected animals
    • Measures to be applied
      • No other measures
  • Diagnostic test results
    • Laboratory name and type – Species – Test - Test date – Result
      • Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency (National laboratory) – Birds - reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) - 24/11/2016 – Positive
  • Future Reporting
    • The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

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Keywords: OIE; Updates; H5N6; Avian Influenza; Poultry; S. Korea.

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Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N8, #France [#poultry #outbreak] (#OIE, Dec. 2 ‘16)

 

Title: Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N8, #France [#poultry #outbreak].

Subject: Avian Influenza, H5N8 subtype, poultry epizootic in France.

Source: OIE, full page: (LINK).

Code: [     ]

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Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8, France

Information received on 02/12/2016 from Dr Loic Evain, Directeur Général adjoint, CVO, Direction générale de l'alimentation, Ministère de l'Agriculture, de l'Agroalimentaire et de la Forêt, Paris, France

  • Summary
    • Report type Immediate notification
    • Date of start of the event 25/11/2016
    • Date of confirmation of the event 01/12/2016
    • Report date 02/12/2016
    • Date submitted to OIE 02/12/2016
    • Reason for notification New strain of a listed disease
    • Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
    • Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
    • Serotype H5N8
    • Nature of diagnosis Clinical, Laboratory (advanced)
    • This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
  • New outbreaks
    • Summary of outbreaks
      • Total outbreaks: 1
        • Outbreak Location  - TARN ( Almayrac, Almayrac )
          • Total animals affected: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
            • Birds  - 5143  - 2000  - 2000  - 0  - 0
          • Outbreak statistics: Species - Apparent morbidity rate - Apparent mortality rate - Apparent case fatality rate - Proportion susceptible animals lost*
            • Birds - 38.89% - 38.89% - 100.00% - 38.89%
              • * Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter;
  • Epidemiology
    • Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
      • Contact with wild species
  • Epidemiological comments
    • A 3-km protection zone and a 10-km surveillance zone were implemented around the affected farms.
  • Control measures
    • Measures applied
      • Screening
      • Disinfection / Disinfestation
      • Traceability
      • Surveillance outside containment and/or protection zone
      • Surveillance within containment and/or protection zone
      • Zoning
      • Vaccination permitted (if a vaccine exists)
      • No treatment of affected animals
    • Measures to be applied
      • Stamping out
      • Official disposal of carcasses, by-products and waste
  • Diagnostic test results
    • Laboratory name and type - ANSES National Reference Laboratory for avian influenza and Newcastle disease, Ploufragan ( National laboratory )
      • Tests and results: Species – Test - Test date – Result
        • Birds - nucleotide sequencing - 01/12/2016 – Positive
        • Birds - real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) - 01/12/2016 – Positive
  • Future Reporting
    • The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

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Keywords: OIE; Updates; H5N8; Avian Influenza, Poultry; France.

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#Avian #Influenza #H5N8, #Global #situation #update - 02 December 2016 (#FAO, edited)

 

Title: #Avian #Influenza #H5N8, #Global #situation #update - 02 December 2016 .

Subject: Avian Influenza, H5N8 subtype, current panzootic situation.

Source: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), full page: (LINK).

Code: [     ][     ]

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Avian Influenza H5N8, GLOBAL situation update - 02 December 2016

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Disclaimer

Information provided herein is current as of the date of issue. Information added or changed since the last H7N9 situation update appears in red. Human cases are depicted in the geographic location of their report. For some cases, exposure may have occurred in one geographic location but reported in another. For cases with unknown onset date, reporting date was used instead. FAO compiles information drawn from multiple national (Ministries of Agriculture or Livestock, Ministries of Health, Provincial Government websites; Centers for Disease Prevention and Control [CDC]) and international sources (World Health Organization [WHO], World Organisation for Animal Health [OIE]) as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. FAO makes every effort to ensure, but does not guarantee, accuracy, completeness or authenticity of the information. The designation employed and the presentation of material on the map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of FAO concerning the legal or constitutional status of any country, territory or sea area, or concerning the delimitation of frontiers.

 

Overview

  • Situation:
    • H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) 2016 virus in Asia, Europe and Middle East with pandemic potential.
  • Confirmed countriesx:
    • Austria*,
    • Croatia,
    • Denmark*,
    • Germany*,
    • Hungary*,
    • India*,
    • Israel*,
    • the Netherlands*,
    • Poland,
    • Russian Federation*,
    • Switzerland,
    • Iran (Islamic Republic of)*,
    • Sweden*,
    • Finland,
    • Romania and
    • France*and
    • Egypt.
      • Note: the Ukraine and Tunisia have reported H5 HPAI in wild birds; investigations are ongoing to determine the N type.
  • Animal/environmental findings
    • Domestic bird species affected:
      • Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus),
      • Duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus),
      • Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo),
      • Goose (Anserinae sp.),
      • Guinea fowl (Numididae sp.).
    • Wild bird species affected:
      • Been Goose (Anser fabalis),
      • Black Swan (Cygnus atratus),
      • Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus),
      • Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo),
      • Common Coot (Fulica atra),
      • Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula),
      • Common Magpie (Pica pica),
      • Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus),
      • Common Pochard (Aythya ferina),
      • Common Shelduck (Tadorna tadorna),
      • Common Teal (Anas crecca),
      • Common Tern (Sterna hirundo),
      • crow (Corvus sp.),
      • curlew (Numenius sp.),
      • Emu (Dromaius novaeollandiae),
      • Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata),
      • Eurasian wigeon (Anas penelope),
      • Great Cested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus),
      • Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo),
      • Gadwall (Anas strepera),
      • Great black-backed Gull (Larus marinus),
      • Greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus),
      • Greater Rhea (Rhea americana),
      • Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus),
      • Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea),
      • Gull (Laridae),
      • Herring Gull (Larus argentatus),
      • Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus),
      • Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis),
      • Mew Gull (Larus canus),
      • Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos),
      • munia (Lonchura sp.),
      • Mute Swan (Cygnus olor),
      • owl (Strigiformes),
      • Painted Stork (Mycteria leucocephala),
      • Peacock (Pavo cristatus),
      • pelican (Pelecanus sp.),
      • Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus),
      • pheasant (Phasianidae sp.),
      • Red-crested Pochard (Netta rufina),
      • stork (Ciconiidae sp.),
      • Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula),
      • Whooper swan (Cygnus cygnus),
      • Wild Duck (Aythyinae or Anatinae sp.),
      • Yellow-legged Gull (Larus michahellis).
  • Number of human cases:
    • None reported to date.

 

Map 1. H5N8 HPAI outbreaks officially reported in Asia, Europe and Africa by onset date, since 1 June 2016

H5N8 HPAI outbreaks officially reported in Asia, Europe and Africa by onset date, since 1 June 2016

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FAO's support to countries

  • Global level
    • A webinar titled Intercontinental spread of H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza – Analysis of the current situation and recommendations for preventive action, targeting national veterinary services and FAO regional and country teams, was conducted by FAO on 24 November 2016 [link]
    • A teleconference on H5N8 HPAI and wild birds has been held by the OFFLU wildlife group on 22 November 2016
    • An alert message, with emphasis on the heightened risk of H5N8 HPAI incursion faced by African countries, has been sent to CVOs on 15 November 2016
    • EMPRES Watch, September 2016: H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) of clade 2.3.4.4 detected through surveillance of wild migratory birds in the Tyva Republic, the Russian Federation – potential for international spread [link]
    • EMPRES news, 4 November 2016: H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza detected in Hungary and in the Republic of India H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza detected in Hungary and in the Republic of India [link]
    • Report of the WHO Vaccine Composition Meeting September 2016 [link]
  • Regional level
    • FAO Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia news, November 2016: Highly pathogenic avian influenza spreading in Europe, South Asia [link]
    • FAO Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia news, September 2016: Emergent Avian Influenza virus detected in surveillance of migratory birds in Russian Federation (FAO Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia news [link]

 

Recent publications

  • Lee DH, Sharshov K, Swayne DE, Kurskaya O, Sobolev I, Kabilov M, Alekseev A, Irza V, Shestopalov A. Novel Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 Avian Influenza A(H5N8) Virus in Wild Aquatic Birds, Russia, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017 Feb 15;23(2). doi: 10.3201/eid2302.161252. [Reference].
    • In June 2016, we collected samples from 13 dead and 30 hunter-harvested wild aquatic birds around Uvs-Nuur Lake (Tyva Republic) at the Russia–Mongolia border. We isolated a total of 11 subtype H5 influenza viruses from birds of various species: the black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus), gray heron (Ardea cinerea), common tern (Sterna hirundo), great crested grebe (Podiceps cristatus), and great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the HA, NA, and NS genes of three isolates clustered with H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 group B HPAIV viruses identified in eastern China in 2014. The PB1, PB2, PA, NP, and M genes clustered with LPAIV identified in Mongolia, China, and Vietnam.
  • Globig A, Starick E, Homeier T, Pohlmann A, Grund C, Wolf P, Zimmermann A, Wolf C, Heim D, Schlößer H, Zander S, Beer M, Conraths FJ, Harder TC. Epidemiological and Molecular Analysis of an Outbreak of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 in a German Zoo: Effective Disease Control with Minimal Culling. Transbound Emerg Dis. (2016 Nov 15) [Reference].
    • Highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAIV) subtype H5N8, clade 2.3.4.4, caused five outbreaks in poultry holdings in Germany between autumn 2014 and February 2015. In addition, birds kept in a zoo in north-eastern Germany were affected. Only a few individual white storks (Ciconia ciconia) showed clinical symptoms and eventually died in the course of the infection, although subsequent in-depth diagnostic investigations showed that other birds kept in the same compound of the white storks were acutely positive for or had undergone asymptomatic infection with HPAIV H5N8. An exception from culling all of the 500 remaining zoo birds was granted by the competent authority. Restriction measures included grouping the zoo birds into eight epidemiological units in which 60 birds of each unit tested repeatedly negative for H5N8. This case demonstrates that alternatives to culling exist to rescue valuable avifaunistic collections after incursions of HPAIV.

 

Recommendations for affected countries and those at risk

  • FAO recommends intensified surveillance and awareness raising by national authorities.
    • There is no benefit to be gained in attempting to control the virus in wild birds through culling or habitat destruction. Spraying of birds or the environment with disinfectant – for example sodium hypochlorite or bleach – is considered potentially counter-productive, harmful to the environment and not effective from a disease control perspective.
    • There is also no justification for any pre-emptive culling of endangered species in zoological collections. Control measures for captive wild birds in places where virus is detected should be based on strict movement control, isolation and only when necessary limited culling of affected birds.
  • General recommendations
    • It is important to report sick or dead birds – both wild birds and poultry - to local authorities (veterinary services, public health officials, community leaders etc.). These should be tested for avian influenza viruses.
    • Wash hands properly and often. You should always do so after handling birds or other animals, when cooking or preparing animal products, and before eating.
    • Eat only well-cooked meat products, and refrain from collecting, consuming or selling animals found sick or dead.
    • Seek immediate advice from your physician if you show signs of fever after being in contact with poultry, farmed birds, wild birds or other animals.
  • Recommendations to poultry producers
    • Farmers and poultry producers should step up their biosecurity measures in order to prevent potential virus introduction from wild birds or their faeces.
    • It is important to keep poultry and other animals away from wild birds and their sub-products or droppings through screens, fencing or nets.
    • Commercial poultry operations and backyard poultry owners should avoid the introduction of pathogens through contaminated clothes, footwear, vehicles or equipment used in waterfowl hunting.
  • Recommendations to hunters
    • Hunting associations and wildlife authorities should be aware that H5N8 and other avian influenza viruses might be present in waterfowl hunted during fall migration 2016 and that hunting, handling and dressing of shot waterfowl carries the risk of spreading avian influenza viruses to susceptible poultry.
    • Avoid introduction of avian influenza viruses to poultry through fomites (clothing, boots, vehicles, etc.) and do not feed wild bird scraps to poultry.
    • Water bird scraps should not be fed to domestic animals (cats, dogs, or poultry).
    • Any waste from hunted birds should be treated as potentially contaminated and safely disposed of.
  • Recommendations to national authorities
    • Increase surveillance efforts for the early detection of H5N8 and other influenza viruses in poultry and dead wild birds.
    • Provide means for reporting sick or dead birds, e.g. hotlines and collection points.
    • Raise awareness of the general population, poultry producers or marketers and hunters both about the disease as well as the reporting mechanisms for sick or dead birds.
    • Collaborate with hunting associations for laboratory testing of hunted birds, especially in areas that are known to be affected.
    • Provide means for and ensure proper disposal of carcases after sample collection.
    • Ensure that the means for laboratory testing are in place to detect the currently circulating avian influenza viruses, especially those of clade 2.3.4.4.
    • Gene sequencing should be performed for all H5 viruses detected, and results shared with the global community in a timely manner. This will aid understanding of how the virus is spreading.
    • Action on wild birds not recommended.

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{x} Reports of H5N8 HPAI events in Taiwan, Province of China, are not included in this update since the virus belongs to a genetically different strain.

{*} Countries in which the virus was also detected in poultry.

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Keywords: FAO; Updates; Avian Influenza; H5N8; Worldwide; Poultry; Wild Birds.

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#US #CDC updates #guidance for #LittleRiver (FL) #area with active #Zika #transmission (@CDCgov, Dec. 2 ‘16)

 

Title: #US #CDC updates #guidance for #LittleRiver (FL) #area with active #Zika #transmission.

Subject: Zika Virus, vector-borne transmission in certain areas of Florida.

Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), full page: (LINK).

Code: [     ]

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CDC updates guidance for Little River (FL) area with active Zika transmission

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Media Statement / For Immediate Release: Friday, December 2, 2016 / Contact: Media Relations, (404) 639-3286

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated Zika guidance for people who travel to or live in the previously identified 1-square-mile area of Little River in Miami-Dade County, FL.

The Little River area of Miami is no longer considered to be an area of active Zika virus transmission (red area).

It is now designated as a Zika cautionary area (yellow area).

There have been no new cases of local Zika virus transmission identified in the Little River area for more than 45 days, suggesting that the risk of Zika virus infection is no longer greater than in the rest of Miami-Dade County.

The red area in South Miami Beach will continue until 45 days pass without new cases. The remainder of Miami-Dade County continues to have the yellow area designation.

Guidance for red areas continues to apply to South Miami Beach.

Guidance for yellow areas now applies to the Little River area and continues for the rest of Miami-Dade County.

In addition:

  • Women and men living in or who traveled to the identified Little River area should be aware this location was considered a red area from Oct 13 to Dec 2, 2016.
  • Partners of pregnant women who lived in or traveled to the affected areas should consistently and correctly use condoms to prevent passing Zika during sex, or they should not have sex with their partner during the pregnancy.
  • Pregnant women who lived in, traveled to, or had sex without a condom with a person who lived in or traveled to the designated area of Little River after Aug 1, 2016, should be tested for Zika virus.
  • Women who traveled to the designated area of Little River after Aug 1, 2016, should wait at least 8 weeks before trying to get pregnant, regardless of whether they had symptoms.
  • Men who traveled to the designated area of Little River after Aug 1, 2016, should wait at least 6 months before trying to get their partner pregnant, regardless of whether they had symptoms.

All of Miami-Dade remains a yellow area and pregnant women are eligible for Zika virus testing. All pregnant women in the United States should be evaluated for possible Zika virus exposure during each prenatal care visit.

To determine whether Zika virus testing is needed, each evaluation should include an assessment of signs and symptoms of Zika virus disease (fever, rash, joint pain, and red eyes), their travel history, and their sexual partner's potential exposure to Zika virus and history of any illness consistent with Zika virus disease.

“At this time, we are removing the red zone from the Little River area of Miami,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

“We still advise pregnant women not to travel to the red zone in South Miami Beach. Furthermore, people living in or visiting Miami-Dade County, including the Little River area, particularly pregnant women, are still encouraged to continue to take steps to prevent mosquito bites and to follow guidelines for preventing sexual transmission. We must remain vigilant.”

As of November 30, a total of 4,496 cases of Zika have been reported in the continental United States and Hawaii through CDC’s ArboNET. These cases include 184 locally transmitted mosquito-borne cases in Florida, 36 cases believed to be the result of sexual transmission, and one case that was the result of a laboratory exposure.

For more information about Zika, visit https://www.cdc.gov/zika/.

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Keywords: US CDC; USA; Updates; Zika Virus; Florida.

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#Zika Virus, #Global #Epidemiological #situation as of 2 December 2016 (@ECDC_EU, summary)

 

Title: #Zika Virus, #Global #Epidemiological #situation as of 2 December 2016.

Subject: Zika Virus, current global epidemiological situation.

Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), full page: (LINK).

Code: [     ]

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Zika Virus, Global Epidemiological situation  as of 2 December 2016

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Since 2015 and as of 1 December 2016, 71 countries and territories have reported evidence of mosquito-borne transmission of the virus. According to a World Health Organization report, as of 30 November, 28 countries or territories have reported microcephaly and other central nervous system malformations in newborns potentially associated with Zika virus infection.

 

Weekly Summary

  • USA
    • On 28 November, Texas reported the first locally-acquired Zika case. The patient is a Cameron County resident with no recent travel to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission and no other risk factors.
    • In Florida, eight new locally-acquired cases have been reported since the last CDTR and as of 30 November.
  • UK
    • On 30 November, the UK reported the first Zika virus infection likely due to sexual transmission. Public Health England (PHE) believes that the woman was infected by a partner who had recently visited an area with active Zika transmission.
  • Myanmar
    • Despite a community-wide search for Zika cases, no additional cases have been detected in the last month.
    • For this reason the case reported on 4 November, has been classified as possibly person-to-person transmission.
  • ECDC comment:
    • sexual transmission in an EU country from a partner exposed in a Zika affected country is not unexpected.
    • The UK is the seventh EU Member State to report locally acquired Zika infection through sexual exposure.
    • This does not change the conclusion of the most recent ECDC rapid risk assessment.
    • In the ECDC maps of countries and territories with autochthonous vector-borne transmission of Zika virus infection:
      • Cameron (Texas) has been added as a county with sporadic transmission
      • Maldives, Palm Beach and Pinellas County (Florida) changed to past transmission as no new cases have been reported in the past three months
      • New Caledonia has been removed from the 'Zika transmission in the past nine months' map

 

Update on the public health emergency of international concern

The fifth meeting of the Emergency Committee (EC) convened by the Director-General under the International Health Regulations (IHR) regarding Zika virus infection, microcephaly and other neurological disorders was held on 18 November 2016.

The EC originally recommended a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) on 1 February 2016 on the basis of an extraordinary cluster of microcephaly and other neurological disorders reported in Brazil, following a similar cluster in French Polynesia and geographic and temporal association with Zika virus infection which required urgent and coordinated and research.

Because research has now demonstrated the link between Zika virus infection and microcephaly, the EC felt that a robust longer-term technical mechanism was now required to manage the global response and research agenda.

Although Zika virus infection and its associated consequences remain a significant enduring public health challenge requiring intense action, it does no longer represent a PHEIC as defined under the IHR.

The EC recommended that a sustained programme of work with dedicated resources should be implemented to address the long-term nature of the disease and its associated consequences. Based on this advice, the Director-General declared the end of the PHEIC.

 

Update on number of cases

  • Worldwide
    • Since 2015 and as of 1 December 2016, 71 countries and territories have reported evidence of mosquito-borne transmission of the virus.
    • Since February 2016 and as of 1 December 2016, 13 countries or territories have reported evidence of person-to-person transmission of the virus, probably via sexual transmission. This includes the UK case, however, it does not include the case in Myanmar.
  • USA
    • On 28 November, Texas reported the first case of locally-acquired Zika virus infection in Cameron County.
    • In Florida, eight new locally-acquired cases of Zika virus infection have been reported since the last CDTR and as of 30 November 2016.
    • As of this date, 244 locally-acquired and 960 travel-related cases have been reported in Florida.
  • EU/EEA imported cases
    • Since June 2015 (week 26), 20 countries (Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) have reported 2 007 travel-associated Zika virus infections through The European Surveillance System (TESSy).
    • Over the same time period, eight EU/EEA Member States reported 99 Zika cases among pregnant women.
  • EU’s outermost regions and overseas territories
    • As of epidemiological week 46, the overall number of cases has been decreasing in the affected French overseas regions and collectivities, with about 20 suspected cases reported in Martinique, 45 in French Guiana, less than 25 in Guadeloupe, 10 in St Barthelemy and 50 in St Martin.

 

Update on microcephaly and/or central nervous system malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection

As of 30 November 2016, 28 countries or territories have reported microcephaly and other CNS malformations in newborns potentially associated with Zika virus infection.

Brazil reports the highest number of cases.

As of 30 November 2016, 20 countries or territories have reported GBS potentially associated with Zika virus infection. The last country reporting a GBS case potentially associated with Zika virus infection is Bolivia.

Web sources:

 

ECDC Assessment

The spread of the Zika virus in the Americas and Asia is likely to continue as the vectors (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes) are widely distributed there.

The likelihood of travel-related cases in the EU is increasing.

A detailed risk assessment was published on 28 October 2016. As neither treatment nor vaccines are available, prevention is based on personal protection measures. Pregnant women should consider postponing non-essential travel to Zika-affected areas.

 

Countries and territories with reported confirmed autochthonous cases of Zika virus infection in the past three months, as of 2 December 2016

[Countries – Region - Last case since 3 months]

  1. American Samoa – … - Widespread transmission
  2. Anguilla – …  - Widespread transmission
  3. Antigua and Barbuda – … - Widespread transmission
  4. Aruba – … - Widespread transmission
  5. Bahamas – … - Widespread transmission
  6. Barbados – … - Widespread transmission
  7. Belize – … - Widespread transmission
  8. Bolivia – … - Widespread transmission
  9. Bonaire – … - Widespread transmission
  10. Brazil – … - Widespread transmission
  11. British Virgin Islands (UK) – … - Widespread transmission
  12. Cayman Islands – … - Widespread transmission
  13. Colombia – … - Widespread transmission
  14. Costa Rica – … - Widespread transmission
  15. Cuba – … - Sporadic transmission
  16. Curaçao – … - Widespread transmission
  17. Dominica – … - Widespread transmission
  18. Dominican Republic – … - Widespread transmission
  19. Ecuador – … - Widespread transmission
  20. El Salvador – … - Widespread transmission
  21. Fiji – … - Widespread transmission
  22. French Guiana – … - Widespread transmission
  23. Grenada – … - Widespread transmission
  24. Guadeloupe – … – Widespread transmission
  25. Guatemala – … - Widespread transmission
  26. Haiti – … - Widespread transmission
  27. Honduras – … - Widespread transmission
  28. Jamaica – … - Widespread transmission
  29. Malaysia – … - Sporadic transmission
  30. Martinique – … - Widespread transmission
  31. Mexico – … - Widespread transmission
  32. Micronesia, Federated States of – … - Widespread transmission
  33. ​Montserrat – … - ​Sporadic transmission
  34. Nicaragua – … - Widespread transmission
  35. ​Palau – … - ​Sporadic transmission
  36. Panama – … - Widespread transmission
  37. Paraguay – … - Widespread transmission
  38. Peru – … - Widespread transmission
  39. Philippines – … - Widespread transmission
  40. Puerto Rico – … - Widespread transmission
  41. Saba – … - Sporadic transmission
  42. Saint Kitts and Nevis – … - Widespread transmission
  43. Saint Lucia – … - Widespread transmission
  44. Saint Martin – … - Widespread transmission
  45. Saint-Barthélemy – … - Widespread transmission
  46. ​Saint Vincent and the Grenadines – … - ​Widespread transmission
  47. Singapore – … - Widespread transmission
  48. Sint Eustatius – … - Widespread transmission
  49. Sint Maarten – … - Widespread transmission
  50. Suriname – … - Widespread transmission
  51. Thailand – … - Widespread transmission
  52. Trinidad and Tobago – … - Widespread transmission
  53. ​Turks and Caicos – … - ​Widespread transmission
  54. United States of America - Miami-Dade - Widespread transmission
  55. ​United States of America - ​Cameron County - ​Sporadic transmission
  56. US Virgin Islands – … - Widespread transmission
  57. Venezuela – … - Widespread transmission
  58. Vietnam – …- Widespread transmission
    • The classification of countries above is based on:
      • 1) number of reported autochthonous confirmed cases;
      • 2) number of countries who report a zika virus transmission or a country’s transmission status changes;
      • 3) duration of the circulation.

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All latest ECDC maps with information on countries or territories with reported confirmed autochthonous cases of Zika virus infection.

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- See more at: http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/healthtopics/zika_virus_infection/zika-outbreak/Pages/epidemiological-situation.aspx#sthash.8bkraOxi.dpuf

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Keywords: ECDC; Updates; Worldwide; Zika Virus.

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Weekly #US #Influenza #Surveillance #Report - 2016-17 Season, Wk 47 ending November 26, 2016 (@CDCgov, summary)

 

Title: Weekly #US #Influenza #Surveillance #Report - 2016-17 Season, Wk 47 ending November 26, 2016.

Subject: Seasonal Influenza Activity Surveillance, weekly US CDC report.

Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), FluView, full page: (LINK). Summary.

Code: [     ]

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Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report - 2016-2017 Influenza Season Week 47 ending November 26, 2016

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|-- Full report also available as PDF –|

All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received.

 

Synopsis:

  • During week 47 (November 20-26, 2016), influenza activity increased slightly, but remained low in the United States.
    • Viral Surveillance:
      • The most frequently identified influenza virus subtype reported by public health laboratories during week 47 was influenza A (H3).
      • The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza in clinical laboratories increased slightly, but remained low.
    • Pneumonia and Influenza Mortality:
      • The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was below the system-specific epidemic threshold in the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Surveillance System.
    • Influenza-associated Pediatric Deaths:
      • No influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.
    • Outpatient Illness Surveillance:
      • The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 1.8%, which is below the national baseline of 2.2%.
      • Three regions reported ILI at or above their region-specific baseline levels.
      • Puerto Rico experienced high ILI activity, one state experienced moderate ILI activity, New York City and five states experienced low ILI activity, 44 states experienced minimal ILI activity, and the District of Columbia had insufficient data.
    • Geographic Spread of Influenza:
      • The geographic spread of influenza in Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and one state was reported as regional; 12 states reported local activity; the District of Columbia and 36 states reported sporadic activity; and one state reported no activity.

 

National and Regional Summary of Select Surveillance Components

[HHS Surveillance Regions* - Data for current week: Out-patient ILI† - Number of jurisdictions reporting regional or widespread activity§ - % respiratory specimens positive for flu in clinical laboratories- Data cumulative since October 2, 2016 (week 40): A(H1N1)pdm09 - A (H3) - A (Subtyping not Performed) - B Victoria lineage - B Yamagata lineage - B lineage not performed - Pediatric Deaths]

Influenza test results from public health laboratories only

  • Nation – Normal - 4 of 54 - 3.6% – 65 – 731 – 53 – 34 – 21 – 40 – 0
    • Region 1 – Normal - 0 of 6 - 1.1% – 0 – 34 – 0 – 0 – 0 – 0 – 0
    • Region 2 – Elevated - 2 of 4 - 1.3% – 0 – 67 – 0 – 14 – 4 – 3 – 0
    • Region 3 – Normal - 0 of 6 - 0.7% – 6 – 42 – 1 – 1 – 1 – 4 – 0
    • Region 4 – Elevated - 1 of 8 - 5.8% – 4 – 58 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 25 – 0
    • Region 5 – Normal - 0 of 6 - 1.1% – 2 – 60 – 29 – 6 – 3 – 0 – 0
    • Region 6 – Normal - 0 of 5 - 2.1% – 8 – 16 – 0 – 5 – 5 – 0 – 0
    • Region 7 – Normal - 0 of 4 - 0.9% – 0 – 12 – 5 – 2 – 0 – 0 – 0
    • Region 8 – Normal - 0 of 6 - 2.2% – 28 – 80 – 2 – 0 – 0 – 0 – 0
    • Region 9 – Normal - 1 of 5 - 2.1% – 16 – 188 – 11 – 1 – 6 – 4 – 0
    • Region 10 – Elevated - 0 of 4 - 8.3% – 1 – 174 – 1 – 2 – 0 – 4 – 0

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{*} HHS regions (Region 1 CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT; Region 2: NJ, NY, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands; Region 3: DE, DC, MD, PA, VA, WV; Region 4: AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN; Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI; Region 6: AR, LA, NM, OK, TX; Region 7: IA, KS, MO, NE; Region 8: CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY; Region 9: AZ, CA, Guam, HI, NV; and Region 10: AK, ID, OR, WA).

{†} Elevated means the % of visits for ILI is at or above the national or region-specific baseline

{§} Includes all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands

{‡} National data are for current week; regional data are for the most recent three weeks

 

U.S. Virologic Surveillance

WHO and NREVSS collaborating laboratories, which include both public health and clinical laboratories located in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, report to CDC the total number of respiratory specimens tested for influenza and the number positive for influenza by virus type. In addition, public health laboratories also report the influenza A subtype (H1 or H3) and influenza B lineage information for the viruses they test and the age or age group of the persons from whom the specimens were collected.

Additional data are available at http://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/fluview/fluportaldashboard.html and http://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/fluview/flu_by_age_virus.html.

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The results of tests performed by clinical laboratories during the current week are summarized below.

[Week 47 - Data Cumulative since October 2, 2016 (Week 40)]

  • No. of specimens tested - 14,787 - 119,242
    • No. of positive specimens (%) – 525 (3.6%) - 2,510 (2.1%)
      • Positive specimens by type:
        • Influenza A - 372 (70.9%) - 1,626 (64.8%)
        • Influenza B - 153 (29.1%) - 884 (35.2%)

(…)

View National and Regional Level Graphs and Data

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The results of tests performed by public health laboratories, as well as the age group distribution of influenza positive tests, during the current week are summarized below.

[Week 47 - Data Cumulative since October 2, 2016 (Week 40)]

  • No. of specimens tested – 541 - 7,728
    • No. of positive specimens* – 62 – 944
      • Positive specimens by type/subtype:
        • Influenza A - 54 (87.1%) - 849 (89.9%)
          • A(H1N1)pmd09 - 2 (3.7%) - 65 (7.7%)
          • H3 - 31 (57.4%) - 731 (86.1%)
          • Subtyping not performed - 21 (38.9%) - 53 (6.2%)
        • Influenza B - 8 (12.9%) - 95 (10.1%)
          • Yamagata lineage - 1 (12.5%) - 21 (22.1%)
          • Victoria lineage - 0 (0%) - 34 (35.8%)
          • Lineage not performed - 7 (87.5%) - 40 (42.1%)

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{*} The percent of specimens testing positive for influenza is not reported because public health laboratories often receive samples that have already tested positive for influenza at a clinical laboratory and therefore percent positive would not be a valid indicator of influenza activity. Additional information is available at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/overview.htm.

(…)

View National and Regional Level Graphs and Data

(…)

 

Antigenic Characterization

CDC has antigenically characterized 34 influenza viruses [7 influenza A (H1N1)pdm09, 15 influenza A (H3N2), and 12 influenza B viruses] collected by U.S. laboratories since October 1, 2016.

  • Influenza A Virus [22]
    • A (H1N1)pdm09 [7]:
      • All 7 (100%) influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 viruses were antigenically characterized using ferret post-infection antisera as A/California/7/2009-like, the influenza A (H1N1) component of the 2016-2017 Northern Hemisphere vaccine.
    • A (H3N2) [15]:
      • All 15 (100%) influenza A (H3N2) viruses were antigenically characterized as A/Hong Kong/4801/2014-like, a virus that belongs in genetic group 3C.2a and is the influenza A (H3N2) component of the 2016-2017 Northern Hemisphere vaccine, by HI testing or neutralization testing.
  • Influenza B Virus [12]
    • Victoria Lineage [5]:
      • All 5 (100%) B/Victoria-lineage viruses were antigenically characterized using ferret post-infection antisera as B/Brisbane/60/2008-like, which is included as an influenza B component of the 2016-2017 Northern Hemisphere trivalent and quadrivalent influenza vaccines.
    • Yamagata Lineage [7]:
      • All 7 (100%) B/Yamagata-lineage viruses were antigenically characterized using ferret post-infection antisera as B/Phuket/3073/2013-like, which is included as an influenza B component of the 2016-2017 Northern Hemisphere quadrivalent influenza vaccines.

(…)

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Keywords: US CDC; USA; Updates; Seasonal Influenza.

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